Special Issue: In Honor of Jacques Barchilon

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Marvels & Tales Volume 25, Number 2

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Little in the field of fairy-tale studies is totally new. One genuinely innovative event, however, was without question Jacques Barchilon’s founding of Merveilles et contes in 1987. To be sure, Barchilon had been inspired by Fabula: Zeitschrift für Erzählforschung/Journal of Folktale Studies/Revue d’études sur le conte populaire, which had first appeared thirty years earlier. But Jacques Barchilon’s new journal— which was titled Merveilles & contes/Marvels & Tales/Wunder & Märchen/Maravilla & cuentos/Meraviglie & racconti and challenged many a cataloger and bibliographer—reflected not only the vivid personality and creativity of its founder but also the exploding field of fairy-tale studies itself, which was simultaneously thriving and struggling to define its scope and place.


Special Issue: In Honor of Jacques Barchilon

An Interview with Jacques Barchilon: From Free French Soldier to Fairy-Tale Pioneer
Anne E. Duggan

The Meaning of Fairy Tale within the Evolution of Culture
Jack Zipes

Animal-Human Hybridity in d’Aulnoy’s “Babiole” and “Prince Wild Boar”
Lewis C. Seifert

Merveilles et contes chez le duc de Saint-Simon
Philippe Hourcade

Le roi Herla au pays de Galles: Lectures nationalistes du voyage dans l’autre monde
Catherine Velay-Vallantin

George Cruikshank’s Graphic and Textual Reactions to Mother Goose
Judd D. Hubert

Naming the Helper: Maternal Concerns and the Queen’s Incorrect Guesses in the Grimms’ “Rumpelstiltskin”
Ann Schmiesing

“I Spy Rumpelstiltskin”: Playing Games with the Reader in The Witch’s Boy
Maria Nikolajeva

Between Straparola and Basile: Three Fairy Tales from Lorenzo Selva’s Della metamorfosi (1582)
Suzanne Magnanini

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Additional Information
Additional Information 6x9, 216 pages, published January 25, 2012

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